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AFTER THE ELECTION

VOTE


This week we will go to our polling place and vote for our favorite candidates. Some of us will be in a mood to rejoice and some of us will be down in the dumps. This seems to be a year when the choices are very very clear. This will make our recovery a little bit more difficult. There is a place where one can take our battered psyches. Go and listen to some live impartial music. I recommend finding a jazz club that provides a complete brain wash, a place where you get lost in the music.

Look for an impartial piano player who uses both left hand and right hand to make a statement. This week at the Dirty Dog Jazz Café on election eve Charles Boles will soothe our spirits while the votes are counted.  Wednesday Michael Zaporski’s  hands will be on the Dirty Dog’s magnificent Steinway which will be set in recovery mode.

A LITTLE PIANO MUSIC WILL MAKE EVERYTHING ALL RIGHT


CHARLES BOLES


MICHAEL ZAPORSKI

THEY WILL BE PLAYING A STEINWAY “B” PIANO  AT THE DIRTY DOG JAZZ CAFÉ.

In 2013 the owner of the Dirty Dog, Gretchen Carhartt Valade  bought a 7’ Steinway “B” piano. She then flew in one of the world’s greatest bebop pianists, of all-times, Detroiter Barry Harris, to christen it.


AT THE DIRTY DOG JAZZ CAFE, BEBOP LEGEND, BARRY HARRIS, BLESSED THE NEW HOUSE PIANO IN A NIGHT TO BE REMEMBERED

STEINWAY HAS BEEN A GOOD CITIZEN

During World War II, the Steinway factory in Queens received orders from the Allied Armies to build wooden gliders to convey troops behind enemy lines. Steinway could make few normal pianos, but built 2,436 special models called the Victory Vertical or G.I. Piano. It was a small piano that four men could lift, painted olive drab, gray, or blue, designed to be carried aboard ships or dropped by parachute from an airplane to bring music to the soldiers.

The factory in Hamburg, Germany, could sell very few pianos during World War II. No more than a hundred pianos per year left the factory. In the later years of the war, the company was ordered to give up all the prepared and dried wood their lumber yard held for war production. In an air raid over Hamburg, several Allied bombs hit the factory and nearly destroyed it. After the war, Steinway restored the Hamburg factory with help from the Marshall Plan. Eventually, the post-war cultural revival boosted demand for entertainment and Steinway increased piano production at the Hamburg and Queens factories, going from 2,000 in 1947 to 4,000 pianos a year by the 1960s.

GOOD NEWS

VOTERS  ARE ALSO GOOD CITIZENS AND WILL BE REWARDED


AT THE DIRTY DOG POST ELECTION RECOVERY CENTER

PIANIST MICHAEL ZAPORSKI   NOVEMBER 9-12

All losers and winners labels will be turned in at the Dirty Dog Jazz Café door. Piano jazz will help lift some hanging heads and help some celebrate. This will be the place to get back to normal. Keep your glow and lose your blues at the Dirty Dog this week.

John Osler

#Detroit #DirtyDog #DetroitJazzFestival #CharlesBoles #Music #DetroitJazz #DirtyDogJazzCafé #JudyAdams #JazzinDetroit #JAZZMUSIC #GretchenValade

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